SEmG

Drummond T9 "Greyhound" class 4-4-0

Of all of Dugald Drummond's designs for the LSWR his T9 express passenger class could probably be described as his most successful. They were popular with their crews and nicknamed "greyhounds" due to their sprightly acceleration. This was due to the design being remarkably free-running with a well steaming boiler, substantial firegrate and masterfully applied Stephenson link motion.
 
Nº301 of December 1900 on a pre-grouping train.

photograph: Mike Morant collection

301
 
30726 An unidentified T9 heads its train in LSWR days.

photograph by Mike Morant

 
Nº 122 photographed at Andover, date unknown.

photograph: Mike Morant collection

122 at Andover
 
310 Nº310 of April 1901 on an unidentified train during Southern days, date unknown. Note the wider splashers on these last two locomotives when compared with earlier engines, such as Nº301 above and Nº30119 below.

photograph: Mike Morant collection

 
Nº 300 on a down Eastbourne Pullman train on the Quarry Line. This was probably a Sundays only working.

photograph: Dr. Ian C. Allan/Mike Morant collection

300 on a down Eastbourne Pullman
 
312 at Hamsey Crossing Nº312 hauling an Up Sunday Eastbourne Excursion train with Pullman Portion at Hamsey Crossing near Lewes.

photograph: Dr. Ian C. Allan/Mike Morant collection

 
Nº113 hauling a train near Bournemouth during 1939. This was the first T9 to be built at Nine Elms, in June 1899, as all the previous locos had been built by Dübs & Co. The somewhat confusing system of calling a class by the first loco's running number if built by an outside contractor or by class if built in-house makes this the first "official" T9, the previous locos originally being known as "702s", or colloquially as "Dübs Express". Nº113 was also one of the unfortunate locos involved in the oil burning experiment, which led to premature withdrawal in May 1951.

photograph: Mike Morant collection

113
 
30119 Nº30119 photographed on the Windsor side of Clapham Junction. For many years from 1935 this engine was kept in pristine condition, painted in green with engine and tender wheels lined out, black shaded gilt lettering and numerals and with the metalwork highly burnished and a number of her fittings chrome plated. An organ pipe whistle was fitted and plaques bearing the royal coat of arms were provided for fitting to the leading splashers when required. Seen here, probably in 1948, in early British Railways livery, she was withdrawn in December 1952. At one time suggested for preservation, that choice finally settled on the next loco in line, Nº30120.

photograph: Mike Morant collection

All photographs are copyright

First | 2nd | 3rd | Last | Data | Tenders

This page was last updated 17 July 2011

SR Target

Valid CSS!    Valid HTML 4.01!