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Waterloo

During the spring and summer of 2000 new Railtrack corporate image signs began appearing at major stations. The new signs in use at Waterloo - this pictured on 16 September 2000 - feature a stylised lion emblem. The lion has long been associated with Waterloo resulting from the famous stone lion sculpture in the area.

photograph by Colin Duff

Waterloo
 
Waterloo By 2005 the high level "flap" departures and arrivals indicators above the barrier line had been placed by low level plasma displays on the concourse at right angles to the barrier line. The plasma screens had low contrast displays and required an awning over them to shield them from light from the glazed roof. This was only partially successful and they were difficult to read on a bright day. Nor could they be seen at a quick glance when dashing across the concourse from the Underground to the platforms! Did anyone study passenger habits before deciding to use plasma screens?
Here are those between platforms 11 and 12.

photograph by Colin Duff

 
Here are the screens for the suburban platforms, both this and the above photographed on 11th June 2005.

photograph by Colin Duff

Waterloo
 
Tuesday 13th November 2007 was the end of an era for both the Southern third rail system and Eurostar when Eurostar operations ceased to use both Waterloo International Station. Thirteen years to the day after the first public Eurostar services in and out of Waterloo International their London terminus switched to St. Pancras International and their British depot from Old Oak Common, Acton, to Stratford. With the entire length of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, now branded as High Speed 1, in use Britain has now joined the European High Speed trian network. The final day at Waterloo International was celebrated with a blaze of publicity, entertainments and a media circus.

photographs below by Colin Duff

 
Waterloo Waterloo
 
Waterloo Tuesday 13th November 2007 was the end of an era for both the Southern third rail system and Eurostar when Eurostar operations ceased to use D.C. conductor rail pickup. With the entire length of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (now branded as High Speed 1) in use, which uses 25kV A.C. overhead pickup, Britain has now joined the European High Speed trian network. No more will the visual conjunction of a Class 373 unit, pickup shoes and conductor rail be seen.

photograph by Colin Duff

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This page was last updated 13 March 2009

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