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Faygate

Faygate station today is typical of the wayside station that has fallen on hard times, but has a faint hope of better things in the future. Opened in 1848 and previously known as Fay Gate station, it served a very sparse area with just two or three houses to the south of the station. Initially provided with a station house, goods yard and platform Signalbox, all has been swept away in a tide of "modernisation"! The station was never particularly busy though had a brief period of activity during the Second World War when there was an RAF station nearby. More housing was built when some small dwellings were put up during the 1890s and a couple of small Council Estates were developed after WWII. Some private ownership housing was also constructed between these estates, but a big plan in 1971 for a large development was turned down to protect the Green Belt. More recently there has been an increase in the housing stock with about 40 houses built alongside the station, and there are plans for a larger development once again - but will they come to fruition? Despite the lack of traffic Fay Gate station boasted a service of approximately half hourly interval up to the late 1960s. Renamed as just Faygate station from 5th December 1953, and today unmanned, the service has been drastically reduced to the present time's eleven trains a day in each direction, Monday to Friday only. This might change, though, if those elusive plans for development finally happen.

For many years there was just a timber yard alongside the station to the north, but now a small industrial estate has been added, though it doesn't seem to produce any traffic for the railway.


 
Faygate A very shabby looking Faygate station as photographed in 1985.

photograph by Mark Westcott

 
The entrance to platform 1, the up platform, is through the car park, as photographed on 15th May 2006. Facilities are very basic but at least passengers are provided with some protection from the elements, unlike at neighbouring (and far busier) Littlehaven!

photograph by Peter Richards

Faygate

 
Faygate The entrance to platform 2 is down this pathway from the road overbridge. The station is now fully branded for the New Southern Railway.

photograph by Peter Richards


 
The view looking from the London end of the up platform, across the tracks and towards Horsham. The entrance to platform 2 can be seen descending on the left.

photograph by Peter Richards

Faygate
 
Faygate The minimal shelter provided on the down platform, matching a similar sized one on the up platform, that is probably more than sufficient for the present number of passengers. Behind the fence can be seen some of the recently built housing which, according to a member of the station staff, hasn't yet produced any additional business for the railway.

photograph by Peter Richards


 
In this view looking back from the country end of the down platform it can be seen that the shelters on each platform are of different designs. The member of station staff seen inside the up platform shelter is making his once-a-week visit to change posters and check that everything is OK - other than for this, the station is unmanned. The young lady sitting on the seat was not waiting for a train - which was just as well as it would have been a two hour wait!

photograph by Peter Richards

Faygate

 
Faygate An LB&SCR luggage label for a shipment from Roffey Road Halt. Roffey Road Halt was opened on 1st5 June 1907 between Fay Gate and Littlehaven. It closed in 1937 and there are no remains to be seen today.
The label's age is not known precisely, but was printed sometime between 1907 and 1914.

label from Mike Morant's collection


 
One last footnote to the Fay Gate/Faygate story - this was the last station issuing pre-grouping platform tickets on the ex-LBSCR system. It is believed the stock was in use until 1957!

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This page was last updated 2 June 2006

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