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Charing

Charing Station was built by the London, Chatham and Dover railway and opened, along with the other stations on the Maidstone East-Ashford line, on 1st July 1884. The station building, in common with all the intermediate stations on the line, was based on the design of Sevenoaks Bat & Ball and following the closure of Hothfield Halt in 1959 is the closest station to Ashford on the route.
 
Charing Station

photograph by Gregory Beecroft.

 
Charing is one of two stations on the Maidstone-Ashford line constructed in red brick, the other being Lenham and in common with Lenham is more substantial than the others which were constucted in an attractive creme brick. It is undoubtedly the best looked-after station on the line and, since none of the ground floor windows have been boarded up, probably the most attractive. The single storey annexe on the far left of the picture is a feature that has disappeared from the other stations on the line.

photograph by Stephen Roffey.

Charing Station
 
Charing Station The view of the station from the 'up' platform, on 22nd September 2008, showing that the original station canopy appears to be intact. Note too the attractive lamps which although modern additions are perfectly in keeping with the style the building.

photograph by Stephen Roffey.

 
The small annexe in the foreround is a feature common to all the stations on the route, and was a common LCDR addition - many stations on the Chatham main line having similar ones. The forest of shrubs and trees beyond the station is the site of the former goods yard.

photograph by Stephen Roffey.

Charing Station
 
Charing Station The original LCDR shelter on the up platform as seen from the footbridge. Uniquely for the line this has been modifed with a new front wall and entrance, presumably to offer greater protection to the good burghers of Charing on their way to the City. The original valance was cut back in 1991 to facilitate the passage of oversized intermodal freight trains following the opening of the Channel Tunnel. In common with the other stations on the route, the shelter's side windows have been bricked up - this is believed to have taken place in the mid 1980s. The waste ground behind the fence is the former site of a lengthy refuge siding.

photograph by Stephen Roffey.

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This page was created 7 November 2009

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